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Once Upon a Kimono
The traditional japanese garment gets a new spin with contemporary and minimalistic design, showing endless possibilities by turning it down, styling it up, to become your new versatile piece with much social design, hope, and feeling; through the delicate hands of local traditional sewing culture.
FASHION EDITORIAL IMAGES
KIMONO: KUDEN by takahiro sato FASHION STYLIST: KARO DELGOBBO PHOTOGRAPHER: LUIS APONTE MODEL: CAMILA Wisniewski MAKE-UP: MILI ROTTJER PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: ALFONSO DE HOYOS-ACOSTA
CITY VIBES
Practical, elegant, and striking, the modern kimono can be used throughout your busy day, and it’s also ready for the night. Just throw it on, in case you are not coming back home.
the beauty of movement
With the fabric hanging under the arms, any action you do or take looks graceful and elegant. The kimono, already beautiful, becomes even more beautiful by the actions people take while wearing it.
ETHICAL FASHION
Customers themselves continue to waste fashion. Brands make immense cash flows by quickly satisfying customer demands at the lowest cost to make a profit. In 2013, the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,134 workers and injuring approximately 2,500. Some of the reasons included the addition of more floors above the original permit with substandard construction materials, overload of the building structure, vibration of heavy machinery, and dubious practices from owners who manufactured apparel for many important brands, including Benetton, Prada, Gucci, and Versace. All of that to satisfy the continuous demands of fast fashion and low-cost clothing. Mass production is unable to pay fair fees to sewing factories, so they move to lower markets with the intention of employing personnel at the lowest wages. They also mass-dispose products to keep the brand’s value and continue with the monopoly of profit. KUDEN was reborn as an ethical brand that thinks thoroughly about the work environment and the people involved in our production. The name “KUDEN” comes from “tell to someone by mouth, teach and instruct.” There are many ways to think and approach being ethical, so we can also say there is no exact answer. So we must continue to learn, reflect on what is moral, and put it into practice. -- Kuden by Takahiro Sato

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